How doulas are helping mothers of color in America?
How doulas are helping mothers of color in America?

Doulas are often associated with helping mothers during birth, but historically, they also played a role in helping women at the end of life too, especially in the black community. Mistrust Of The Medical System Among Black Women Currently, many women of color mistrust the medical system in the US. Black women, in particular, are skeptical in accepting the advice of medical practitioners for fear that they may make decisions that aren't in their best interest. When it comes to end-of-life care, communication skills are essential. Both medical professionals and their patients need to be able to discuss options in a clear and transparent way. Research shows, however, that the quality of interactions that black women have with their doctors is much lower than that of white women, leading to misunderstandings that ultimately affect patient care. Doulas are ideal in this situation, acting as a bridge between the patient and the medical system, but many black women do not have access to these services anymore. Blacks In General Are More Likely To Undergo Intensive End-Of-Life Treatment This lack of communication may be why so many more black women undergo intensive end-of-life treatments. Around 45 percent of Medicare beneficiaries make use of hospice services, compared to just 34 percent of African Americans. African Americans are less likely to receive pain medication at the end of life, especially if they live in deprived communities. Doulas were once regularly paired with women of color to assist in circumstances in which a women’s health was threatened. In recent decades, there’s been a falling off in the number of black women getting this support. While doulas were traditionally set aside for women of color, they’ve become increasingly popular among white women, and more and more doulas are themselves white. People from wealthier racial groups can pay for the services of doulas, and many are choosing to do so. It’s created a disparity between the service received by white women and that received by women of color. Grassroots Doulas Are Trying To Change Racial Bias In The Medical System Some doulas are, however, changing the status quo. The purpose of doulas is to provide community-based support for all women, but some have chosen to help black women receive quality care. The medical community likes to throw around statistics about how mortality statistics are improving over time for women of color, but statistics make it easy to forget that each person facing death is an individual who will ultimately take his or her last breath. Doulas are a necessary societal support system who are there to represent all women in their time of need. However, with the support of a competent doula, women of color's lives can be enhanced and at times extended. The current medical system provides medical support, but there’s a lack of emotional and spiritual assistance - something that the medical community often doesn’t feel comfortable providing nor have the proper training to do so. Death doulas are an ideal intermediary that can provide the totality of support women of color need as they approach the end of their lives.

Why is You Are Not Alone Elder Care committed to end of life care?
Why is You Are Not Alone Elder Care committed to end of life care?

Statistics show that death is the 2nd leading fear in the U.S., but it is an inevitable part of the cycle of life. With the right care, education and support, death can be the natural sacred experience it was meant to be. 9/10 people say they want to be cared for at home if terminally ill, yet half die in the hospital or some other institution. At YANAEC we reinforce that no matter what culture, religion or socioeconomic status, we will all encounter end of life. We are committed to sharing education, resources, and quality care making the inevitable death experience as positive as possible.

How does You Are Not Alone LLC ensure a positive passing?
How does You Are Not Alone LLC ensure a positive passing?

“We affirm that the patient isn’t dying but LIVING until the last breath. We support each moment from birth to death being equally valuable. We show up with compassion, care, knowledge and empathy. We love unconditionally.”

Why should I hire an end of life doula?
Why should I hire an end of life doula?

End of Life Doulas provide will physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional support not only to the individual who is dying, but to their wider family as well. There are three key areas of support offered by Death Doulas: Actively engaging the dying person in their death, offering them a voice throughout the process which is all-too-often denied to them – and most importantly acting on and fulfilling their requests, from who should be present at their bedside to what music would make them comfortable. Often, the greatest fear of the dying is simply no longer being a part of the lives of those they love. This important time, supported by a doula, is a unique opportunity for a dying person to leave something – stories, memories, recordings – that the family will always have to remember their loved one through. The doula is also there to support the dying person’s family, as a guide through a difficult and perhaps unfamiliar time. Doulas offer families time to rest and see to the other aspects of everyday life, with the reassurance of constant support for their loved one. The doula is also available after the death to help the family in the initial stages of their grief.

Does YANAEC give medications?
Does YANAEC give medications?

No. We are specially trained as non-medical health care professionals for the elderly. We are trained in all three phases of End of Life Care. Based on this extensive training, the we can offer suggestions for comfort to the patient and family.

If I hire an End of Life Doula will I still need hospice care?
If I hire an End of Life Doula will I still need hospice care?

Yes. hospice manages the care and the loved ones do the caring. The hospice nurse teaches the family how to care for their loved one. Hospice, unfortunately, has a very limited time that they can be at the bedside of the dying. This is where YANAEC fills that need. Hospice also supplies a muti-disciplined team of support and resources, including medication and equipment. YANAEC will guide and advocate for the family based on its extensive end of life education.

When should I call YANAEC for an Elder Care Doula or an End of Life Doula?
When should I call YANAEC for an Elder Care Doula or an End of Life Doula?

Sooner rather than later is our motto. One of the most critical mistakes is asking for end of life support too late. People are living with chronic health conditions that require some form of assistance with daily living for 5, 10, 15 years of their life. Allowing YANAEC to help families at this time is invaluable. It also allows us to give the support early and develop relationships prior to heading into an end of life phase. By doing this, we can have all the anticipated needs and support in place well in advance. This dramatically reduces the inevitable stress and creates the most positive experience possible.

Why is YANAEC so committed to elder and end of life care?
Why is YANAEC so committed to elder and end of life care?

Research shows that elder care and end of life care are not going well for the most part. We are committed to finding better ways to not only help the patients, but their loved ones as well. We recognize the overwhelming toll it takes on family to care for an aging loved one. The stress and fear of caring for someone at end of life at home is heartbreaking. It is simply too much for families to handle.

What are Suzanne O’Brien’s beliefs on end of life?
What are Suzanne O’Brien’s beliefs on end of life?

End of Life Disconnect- A National Hospice Organization Gallup Poll found that nine out of ten people who were terminally ill wanted to die at home, yet half were dying in the hospital. The same poll found that the number one fear of the dying patient was becoming a burden to their family. “Because of our society’s overwhelming fear of death, it is almost impossible to teach families how to fully care for their dying loved ones,” said O’Brien. “Compounding that is the short amount of time the patients spend at home.” In fact, another study found that seven out of ten families said that they felt they were referred to Hospice too late. “We have literally become paralyzed by the topic of death and this fear is making the experience so much harder than it needs to be, for both patients and families,” observes O’Brien. “Planning for end of life wishes and discussing them with loved ones takes a great weight off of both patients and families.”

Where did YANAEC receive its doula training?
Where did YANAEC receive its doula training?

Suzanne B. O’Brien, an award winning Hospice and Oncology Registered Nurse who has been working with this precious population for over a decade, created Doulagivers. Doulagivers is available as a Licensed Training and Certification Training Program to health care agencies and to individual practitioners. There is a screening and application process.

About You Are Not Alone

About Adrian Allotey, Owner, Certified End-of-Life Doula I am currently living my best life by responding to a calling on my life; service to elders and their loved ones. My life’s calling came as a result of being present in my 106 year old, loving grandmother’s journey until her last breath. Although I loved her dearly, I often felt troubled that I couldn’t be there for her like I wanted. Life got in the way; being a wife and mother and having a successful career. She was pretty healthy, but she lacked companionship. I knew there were things that could improve the quality of her life such as long talks, sharing stories, cooked meals, and transportation to the doctors, stores and church. I did my best, but there simply wasn’t enough time in the day to show up like I felt she deserved. Her passing gave my life’s purpose clear; service to elders and their loved ones. I made it my life’s mission to promote the final years as a sacred, beautiful, honorable stage of life. I became a hospice volunteer and a certified end-of-life doula, a person who assists in the dying process, much like a birth doula does with the birthing process. Working with elderly patients has been life affirming so much so that I left a career of 20+ years. Along with my team, we serve as non-medical elderly companions who specialize in physical, emotional and spiritual care. We meet our clients on their terms, see them as whole, and build relationships with them and their loved ones. Our self-care regimen, personal growth and intuition allow us to mindfully hold space and provide comfort for elderly people and their family in a non-judgmental, loving manner. Our motto “heart to heart" is evident in the holistic elder companionship we provide. Holding this space decreases the stress and fears family members face when looking for care for their loved ones; whether they are in need of respite relief, work long hours or live long distance. We can help. Through extensive end-of-life doula training, we are able to provide support, education, and suggestions for comfort. We have a toolkit of available resources to ease the anxious person and their family members including virtual “elder cams,” essential oils, crystals, reiki, mindfulness practices, etc. We are often referred to as “angels”, “Godsends”, “extraordinary”, “beyond belief” and words of the like. Contact us TODAY to see how we can be of assistance to you TOMORROW and we promise to assist in enhancing the life of your loved elder. MEMBERSHIPS National End-of-Life Doula Alliance Doulagivers National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization End of Life Practitioners Collective National Home Funeral Alliance CERTIFICATIONS Doulagivers End of Life Doula Practitioners Training Reiki Level 2 VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE Ascend Hospice Reiki Practitioner and End of Life Doula Haven Hospice Reiki Practitioner


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