Can an End of Life Doula help make funeral arrangements for me?
Can an End of Life Doula help make funeral arrangements for me?

Yes. An End of Life Doula has a ”scope of practice” that includes everything from the time of a terminal diagnosis to helping patients and families as the illness progresses, to the vigil, time of death, understanding and honoring grief and finally recover of life after loss.

What is the difference between and hospice volunteer and an End of Life Doula?
What is the difference between and hospice volunteer and an End of Life Doula?

An End of Life Doula can do everything EXCEPT give a medication and do any form of medical treatment or wound care. There is no limit of number of hours to sit bedside. The hospice volunteer needs to follow Medicare regulations that prohibit any form of touching, moving, feeding, bathing, toileting etc. The hospice volunteer in most US states is limited to a maximum weekly bedside visit of 4 hours. The average volunteer visit is 1-2 hours a week. This does not provide the adjunct support that patients and families so desperately need at this stressful time.

Caregiving While Working
Caregiving While Working

Stretch your time and cover your bases Over 40 million Americans are taking care of a loved one 50 or older. Approximately six in ten of them are doing it while also trying to earn a living. If you’re among them, here’s help. Human Resources Ask your HR rep about company policies and programs to support caregivers. Many companies have a plan in place to help employees find community services, counseling, respite care, legal and financial assistance, and caregiver support groups. Others offer caregiving leave or flexible work arrangements. Some employers may not have a policy for employees who are also caregivers, but they may be open to the idea. AARP and Northeast Business Group on Health have developed a toolkit to help employers support their working caregivers. Share this toolkit with your employer to help them learn more. Employee assistance or your loved one’s insurance carrier might cover visits with a therapist specializing in caretaking or family issues. Sometimes one small thing can be a big help. Be prepared: Even within the same company, different managers may be more or less supportive. Talk to Your Manager If you work for a small company with no HR department, make an appointment with your boss. Be upfront about your caregiving responsibilities from the start. Most bosses value good employees and will work to keep them. Don’t go in with the idea that there is a single answer Present solutions that won’t cost the company money or time. Flextime and telecommuting are accepted practices in many offices. Employers may be more likely to agree if you suggest a trial period that could be continued if successful. Be ready to compromise. A flexible schedule might not be possible, but your company may be willing to change your schedule, let you work from home one day a week, or pay for respite care when you travel for work. If your supervisor lets you work from home, make sure you are always accessible by phone and email. Respond quickly. Attend meetings from home by conference call or Skype. If Skyping, find a quiet room where you won’t be interrupted, and dress as you would at the office. Check in regularly to make sure the arrangement is working for all sides. Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, eligible workers are entitled to unpaid leave for up to 12 weeks per year without losing job security or health benefits, to care for a spouse, child or parent who has a serious health condition. Companies that employ fewer than 50 people are exempt from FMLA. To qualify, you must have worked for the company for at least 1,250 hours in the last 12 months. Check with your HR department to see if you qualify. The company is required by law to tell you your rights under FMLA and, if you qualify, offer you leave. Employers may not threaten you or make your work life difficult because you requested a leave. You may take the 12 weeks of leave all at once or in pieces — for example, three days twice a month when a parent is receiving chemotherapy. When your leave is up, you must return to work to protect your job. Under the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA), employees taking time off to care for a disabled parent or spouse are entitled to the same treatment as coworkers who take time off to care for disabled children. The ADA also gives you protection if you lose your job or are harassed. Some states have laws similar, but not identical, to the federal FMLA. They may provide different benefits. If no law applies, your employer is not required to give you time off or make any accommodations. Look Close to Home Investigate and participate in your local caregiving community. An adult day care program is good for socialization and structure, and has activities designed to maintain or strengthen skills. It may help you to talk to others who are facing the same issues. You also may be able to find people with whom you can have a mutual backup agreement or share a part-time caregiver. Plan Appointments Minimize the time you take away from your job. Schedule your loved one’s doctor and therapy appointments early in the morning or at the end of the day. Don't Abuse Work Time If you have to check in with your loved one, make doctor appointments or do related research, do it during your lunch break. Stay Organized Manage your time efficiently. Set priorities. Tackle the most important items first. When you are stretched between two obligations, it’s easy to forget something. Keep focused by using two to-do lists — one for caregiving and one for work. Put obligations for both caregiving and work on a single calendar. Delegate at work and at home. Show Appreciation Assume your coworkers may be pitching in to assist with the workload when you’re not in the office. Thank them now, and — when you are able — volunteer to help colleagues who are facing similar situations. More For Working Caregivers Learn to control what you can TELL US: How do you keep strong for loved ones? Read more: https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/life-balance/info-2017/work-benefits-rights.html?intcmp=AE-CAR-CLB-R2-C1

Palliative Care Specialists Can Reduce Your Pain and Speed Healing
Palliative Care Specialists Can Reduce Your Pain and Speed Healing

The hospital health team you didn’t know you had David Griffiths couldn’t breathe. The 69-year-old cinematographer had been losing his voice for months. Then, one night last summer, he woke up gasping for breath. “It was frightening,” says Griffiths. “I walked around all night because I was afraid to go back to sleep.” The next day at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, an ENT (ear, nose and throat doctor) probed Griffiths’ throat and discovered a huge white tumor wrapped around his larynx — crushing his windpipe, his esophagus and his vocal cords. Doctors rushed Griffiths into surgery to place a breathing tube in his throat and, over the next few days, inserted a feeding tube in his stomach and a port in his shoulder for delivering medication. Griffiths would need five kinds of chemotherapy, plus radiation, to shrink the tumor and kill the cancer. He’d spend the next six months traveling to and from the hospital several times a week for outpatient treatment and IV rehydration. He was unable to work, or even ride the subway, because he couldn’t risk catching an infection. The unrelenting pain in his neck made it nearly impossible to sleep. But unlike most people who enter the hospital with a severe illness, Griffiths had a secret source of strength: the Mount Sinai palliative care team. Comprising a specially trained doctor, nurses and other practitioners, the team helped Griffiths deal with the pain, stress and logistics of his treatment. In addition to making sure he was on the right dosage of morphine, his palliative care team helped him get rides to and from the hospital, provided a nutritionist, helped coordinate his care with all of his other doctors and answered any questions he had in between visits. “They were fantastic,” Griffiths says. “They kept a close eye on me.” Griffiths’ experience may sound exceptional, but it needn’t be. Palliative care specialists are available at most major hospitals, and they can ease your pain, reduce your stress and perhaps even improve your chance of survival. Their services are typically covered by private insurance, Medicare or Medicaid. So why haven’t you heard of them? To get expert tips to help feel your best, get AARP’s monthly Health newsletter. Health care’s best-kept secret Most people hear the words “palliative care” and think “hospice,” but they are different types of care. Hospice is reserved for when curative treatments have been exhausted and patients have less than six months to live. Palliative care, on the other hand, is a team-based medical specialty focused on providing relief from the symptoms and stress of a serious illness — care that you can get at any age and at any stage of your illness. “Why should you have to be dying to have somebody focus on your quality of life?” asks Sean Morrison, M.D., director of the National Palliative Care Research Center. That’s a relatively new point of view in the American medical system and one of the biggest (and least talked about) changes in health care. Palliative care developed in the U.S. in the 1990s and only became a formal medical subspecialty in 2008. Today, three-quarters of U.S. hospitals with more than 50 beds have a palliative care program, according to the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC). Ninety percent of hospitals with 300 beds or more offer it. And these specialists can have an enormous impact on the quality of your life and your outcomes. When adult patients with blood cancers saw palliative care clinicians at least twice a week during bone marrow transplant procedures, they experienced better symptom control during and after their hospitalization, according to a 2016 study in the medical journal JAMA. A 2010 New England Journal of Medicine study showed that lung cancer patients receiving early palliative care had less depression and better quality of life — and lived nearly three months longer. In fact, the American Society of Clinical Oncology now recommends that all patients diagnosed with advanced cancer receive palliative care within two months of their diagnosis. “People who get palliative care feel better; avoid preventable 911 calls, ER visits and hospitalizations; and stay independent and in better control at home,” says CAPC director Diane Meier, professor of geriatrics and palliative medicine at Mount Sinai. “They have someone who can help if a crisis arises in the middle of the night.” Morrison says a palliative care provider acts like “a quarterback,” working closely with the other team members — which may include a nurse, a chaplain and a social worker—as well as the patient’s other doctors. Communication is critical because one of the major issues people living with serious illness face is the fragmentation of our health care system. “People don’t talk to each other — a particular specialist is only interested in his or her particular organ system,” Morrison says. “My role is to make communication easier by coordinating care.” “Let your specialist focus on treating your disease, prolonging your life, ideally curing you,” says Meier. “Let your palliative care team focus on everything else.” How to get the care you need Approximately 6 million people in the United States have a need for palliative care, according to the CAPC. But most patients don’t know about their options. “The grave majority who could benefit from care are not getting it,” says Meier. One reason is workforce shortages. “There just isn’t enough staff to address the widespread suffering of seriously ill people in hospitals,” she says, “not to mention the much larger numbers of similar people who are not hospitalized.” Another major impediment is a pervasive misunderstanding among doctors of what palliative care is. “Physicians are a major barrier to access,” Meier says. “They often don’t refer, and when patients ask them about it, they say, ‘Oh, you don’t need that. You’re not dying.’ ” If you feel that a palliative care specialist could help with managing your pain and stress, you’ll probably need to ask for it. Morrison recommends you start by saying, “I know I’m not dying, but I’d like the added layer of support that palliative care can provide. Can you refer me to a palliative care specialist?” If your doctor isn’t helpful, use the Find a Provider tool at getpalliativecare.org to search for a specialist in your area. You can look for care that is provided at a hospital, a nursing home or a doctor’s office, or even at home. You may need to be your own advocate and push to get the palliative care that you need or ask your health care proxy or another loved one to help you get it. Four things to tell your doctor What “quality of life” means to you. For some, it may mean maximizing time with loved ones. Others may prioritize relief from pain and other symptoms. Or it may mean remaining independent and making your own decisions for care and where you want to be treated (home versus hospital). Your religious, cultural or personal beliefs. Share anything that might be important to consider in your care and treatment decisions. Which treatments you may or may not want. Remember, you have the right to refuse any treatment you don’t want. Whether you have a living will or health care proxy. Give your doctor a copy. (If you don’t have these yet, consider setting them up.) Read more: https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2018/palliative-care-hospital-health-team.html

In-Home Care Services
In-Home Care Services

Identifying the Best In-Home Care Options for You If your goal is to allow your loved one to continue to live independently at home —in-home care might be the best solution for your loved one and you. There are flexible options that provide care for a few hours, a few days or live-in. The following steps can help you choose the right care arrangement for your situation. Step 1: Determine what you need help with Step 2: Figure out how often you need help Step 3: Assess your budget Step 4: Determine your loved one’s comfort level Step 5: Start evaluating specific companies/caregivers Read more: https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/home-care/in-home-care-services/

Helping Older Adults Accept Caregiving Support at Home
Helping Older Adults Accept Caregiving Support at Home

Researchers identify four key reasons for reluctance and provide families with strategies to overcome them A recent AARP survey found that 76 percent of adults 50 and older want to live in their home as long as possible. Yet as their physical, functional or cognitive needs mount, some are reluctant to accept the help they need, which can compromise their safety and eventually jeopardize their ability to stay in their home. “In my clinic I frequently see patients where I know they need help at home, they’re really struggling, but they don’t want to have help,” says Lee Lindquist, M.D., chief of geriatrics at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago. “There’s a switch that goes off when people reach their 70s or 80s where they don’t want people coming over to help.” After seeing this pattern again and again, Lindquist began to wonder, Why do older adults resist accepting the help they need? and What can be done to overcome this resistance? To find out, she and her colleagues held a series of eight focus groups with adults age 65 and older living in and around Chicago and Fort Wayne, Ind. During the meetings the participants discussed their concerns about remaining in their home as they age and their reasons for being reluctant to accept help there. As the participants discussed their concerns the researchers identified four common themes and then encouraged everyone to brainstorm effective strategies for overcoming their reluctance. The findings were published in the August 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. For more on caregiving, visit AARP's Care Guides. Here are the primary reasons older adults don’t want to accept assistance, along with their suggestions for ways that family members and caregivers can help older adults look at the situation differently and overcome their reluctance. Reason for reluctance: Fear of losing independence If they become unable to complete basic tasks at home, many older adults in the focus groups said they wouldn’t want to ask for help because they worry that it could lead to a further loss of independence. “They feared it would be a slippery slope and they’d end up being sent to a nursing home,” Lindquist explains. In a separate study involving 8,881 adults age 65 and older, researchers in Australia found that the fear of losing one’s independence was second only to the fear of losing one’s physical health, both of which were underscored by a fear of being admitted to a nursing home. Strategy for overcoming it Reframe the concept of independence to reflect “that everyone is dependent on each other in some way,” Lindquist says. From the time we’re born until the time we die, most people depend on others to some extent. It’s a matter of relative independence and autonomy, in other words. Reason for reluctance: Not wanting to be a burden on others Focus group participants feared that asking for help would burden their loved ones who already have plenty to do; some even felt it would be degrading to have to ask. It’s a common refrain: In a previous study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania found that older adults often express concerns about not wanting to burden their adult children and complicate their busy lives. Strategy for overcoming it Acknowledge that letting other people help you gives them satisfaction and joy, so you’re essentially contributing to their well-being. That alone makes it easier to accept help. But when you need to ask for it, “the challenge is to get past that first time,” Lindquist notes. “It’s like dating. Once you get past that first time, it’s easier.” Reason for reluctance: Lack of trust Some people were concerned that by accepting home-based care, they could be taken advantage of or exploited by their helpers. Others worried that they wouldn’t know whom to trust and that that would make them vulnerable. Strategy for overcoming it Think of yourself as in the driver’s seat because you can interview multiple people, ask for recommendations and check references. Once you start working with a helper and it goes well, the trust issue becomes easier to manage, Lindquist says. Reason for reluctance: Not wanting to lose control This fear stemmed from participants’ belief that asking others to help with or take over a task (such as grocery shopping) that they had done previously meant relinquishing control of the situation or that area of their lives. Strategy for overcoming it Remind yourself that “you’re the one in control because you’re doing the asking and you can name the time and place,” Lindquist advises. Also, remember that “if you’re open to help, you’re more likely to stay in your home longer.” After completing the focus groups, Lindquist and her team created an online tool called Plan Your Lifespan (www.planyourlifespan.org) to help older adults, their family members and caregivers better communicate and plan for possible home-based needs. “It was built for seniors by seniors, and it helps people plan for their 70s, 80s, and 90s — what we call the fourth quarter,” Lindquist says. “It’s about empowering older adults and helping them figure out what they want for the future. This way, they have a say before they get sick or injured or there’s an emergency. Ultimately, Lindquist adds, “Seniors need to realize that asking for help doesn’t mean I’m less independent. It just means I want to stay in my home longer.” Read more: https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/home-care/info-2018/overcoming-caregiving-concerns.html?intcmp=AE-CAR-CAH-BB-LL1

Learning to Serve the Dying
Learning to Serve the Dying

End-of-life doulas provide a new type of caregiving to patients and families Cheri Rigby always knew she wanted to work with the dying. As a registered nurse, she was exposed to death frequently, but she believed that more support was needed for those who were facing it. Through an unfortunate circumstance, she was given the opportunity to make a difference. “There was a tragedy — one of my very best friends,” Rigby recalls. “Her daughter was a special needs child. She choked on a Fruit Roll-Up and died. This was a little girl who was at my house all of the time; we spent a lot of time together. When Sophia died, I was sort of the closest person to that, because my friend didn’t have any immediate family. It was a life-changing experience for me. I saw that raw emotion firsthand with my friend, and quite honestly, instead of it scaring me away, it drew me in.” For Alua Arthur, it was meeting a stranger on a bus in Cuba, a young lady who was dying of cancer. Arthur says she engaged the woman in conversation about her inevitable death, and it sparked a fire that she says could not be contained. “I thought, Wow. We’re all going to do this at some point. Why aren’t we all talking about it now? Who are the people to support people through this? On that bus I got super clear this was going to be my work, yet I didn’t really know how.” “There’s a lot of medical support in dying, and there’s some emotional support, as well, but I find that death doulas do a great job of tying it all together." — Death Doula Alua Arthur Arthur and Rigby eventually found their way to becoming what is called an end-of-life, or death, doula – a professional who provides nonmedical caregiving services to people who are dying and to their families. Among the extensive services an end-of-life doula can provide are vigil sitting, vigil planning, respite care for family members, legacy projects to memorialize the life of the soon to be deceased, care coordination, and comfort to the dying person, through techniques such as massage and guided visualizations. Many end-of-life doulas, also known as death midwives, say they are there to complement the care provided by hospitals, senior-care facilities and hospices, as well as to fill in the gaps that occur during the dying process. “Although hospice is wonderful in the death and dying field, they don’t have the hours and hours and hours that the doulas have to really, deeply, get into this work,” says Janie Rakow, a practicing end-of-life doula for nine years and president of the International End of Life Doula Association (INELDA). “There’s a lot of medical support in dying, and there’s some emotional support, as well, but I find that death doulas do a great job of tying it all together and having knowledge about a vast array of subjects,” says Arthur, who has been a death doula for five years. End-of-life doulas bring their skills and expertise to various environments. “For the most part, I would envision that doulas would be practicing at someone’s home,” says Francesca Arnoldy, lead instructor in the University of Vermont End of Life Doula Professional Certificate program. “Caring for someone who would want to die at home, ideally with the support of hospice or palliative care, who then adds the doula in as an additional layer of support. But a doula can be hired to go into an assisted living facility or independent-living facility or even a respite house, hospice house – all of those are also options for doulas.” "[End-of-life doulas] figure out with the family where they are at, what do they need, what’s causing them to become overwhelmed, what kind of services are they looking for.” — Merilynne Rush, co-owner of the Lifespan Doula Association The Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and partner Cabot Creamery Cooperative offer an eight-week online End-of-Life Doula Professional Certificate program. “Our program is comprehensive. On average, people probably spend about 80 to 100 hours on this work,” says Arnoldy. The first thing an end-of-life doula does is work with the client to determine the services needed. "They figure out with the family where they are at, what do they need, what’s causing them to become overwhelmed, what kind of services are they looking for,” explains Merilynne Rush, registered nurse, a practicing doula for 10 years and co-owner of the Lifespan Doula Association. “Different doulas offer different kinds of services.” “It’s being present enough to know what the patient and the family need — things like hand massage, foot massage, encouraging self-care for the family,” says Rigby, who recently completed the University of Vermont program. “It’s very much embracing the entire scenario. It’s not just about you and the dying person. You have to be able to read the situation well enough to fine-tune things.” Many end-of-life doulas find similarities between their role and that of the more commonly known role of a doula, aiding with childbirth. “Waiting for a baby to be born and waiting for a person to die are very similar in terms of the skill set required,” says Patty Brennan, an end-of-life doula with a background in birth and postpartum midwifery, and co-owner of the Lifespan Doula Association. Brennan says both circumstances require the ability to be fearless, patient and calm. There is no oversight credentialing body for end-of-life doulas, but there are programs such as those offered by INELDA, the University of Vermont and the Lifespan Doula Association that offer training and certification. Rakow, the INELDA president, says there was a demand for this type of doula service that led to the creation of her organization, which, along with training and certifying individuals, educates organizations such as hospitals, hospices and senior-care facilities to start their own programs. “People were hungry for it. We kept hearing from people, ‘How can I learn about this? Why doesn’t this exist anywhere else?’ “ “Waiting for a baby to be born and waiting for a person to die are very similar in terms of the skill set required.” — Patty Brennan, co-owner of the Lifespan Doula Association Some doulas have private practices, and others work in connection with hospices, hospitals and community organizations. “We try to forewarn people that if you’re planning to become a private-practice doula, it’s really going to take initiative,” says Arnoldy. “You’re going to have to develop your business and your role in the community and your reputation. You’re not going to look in the newspaper and find a job ad.” In addition to services provided, many are spreading the word and trying to teach the public more about death and the role of a doula. “Word of mouth has really been useful, but also creating opportunities for people to learn about the work,” says Arthur. “I think part of the reason why we’re not inundated with requests is that people don’t know that it exists. A big part of my work is in public education – letting people know that these services exist and that there are people to support them in their time of need.” And practitioners say the work is its own reward. “It's not depressing,” says Rigby. “It’s very powerfully motivating. It’s like a wake-up call that feeds your will to live fully. This is a common thread that folks who work with the dying understand.” Read more: https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/home-care/info-2018/end-of-life-doulas.html?intcmp=AE-CAR-CAH-BB-LL4

Looking At Your Own Mortality
Looking At Your Own Mortality

Dealing with your own mortality can be a challenging prospect, but approaching death doesn’t have to be an unpleasant or deeply distressing experience. With the right support and care, this sacred journey can be calm, peaceful and tranquil. Although death is the only certainty in life, it can be a subject that people shy away from. Even following a decline in health, you may find that even your closest family and friends find it difficult to acknowledge what’s happening. Whilst making plans and remaining in control of your experience can be empowering and reassuring, this can be complicated if those around you feel unable to provide the practical or emotional support you may need. Working with an end-of-life doula ensures you have continued access to care, support, and reassurance during your final days or hours. With prior planning, you and your end-of-life doula can make appropriate arrangements for your passing, including where you want to be in your final hours, how you would like the environment to look, feel or smell and whether you would like anybody else to be present. What does an end-of-life doula do? An end-of-life doula supports you through the sacred journey of death. As well as being with you during your final hours or days, a doula can also provide support in the weeks and months prior to end-of-life care. Whether you want to spend this time in quiet contemplation or doing as much as you can, an end-of-life doula can help you to prepare, emotionally and practically. End-of-life doulas are committed to empowering people throughout their journey, whatever stage they’re at. If you’ve been recently diagnosed with a terminal illness, for example, you may want to discuss the dying process with an experienced professional who can provide all the information and support you need. Additionally, you may wish to work with a doula to create appropriate remembrances for your family, friends and loved ones. Importantly, an end-of-life doula will also be with you during your final days or hours, providing compassionate and professional support throughout. Whilst an end-of-life doula provides comfort and reassurance to their client, they can also be an invaluable support for your family and friends too. When is the right time to contact an end-of-life doula? Your journey should be as unique as you are, so there are no set times at which you should contact a doula. In fact, you should feel able to get in touch with an end-of-life doula at whatever point feels right for you. Whether you want to talk with someone in the days, weeks or months leading up to your death, create lasting remembrances or plan your death, an end-of-life doula can provide the emotional reassurance and practical help you may need. As death approaches, you may wish to have your end-of-life doula with you, to ensure your transition is peaceful and in-keeping with any prior arrangements you may have made. Committed to providing exceptional levels of support, reassurance, and comfort, an end-of-life doula can help you to approach the issue of your own mortality with clarity and calmness.

About You Are Not Alone

About Adrian Allotey, Owner, Certified End-of-Life Doula I am currently living my best life by responding to a calling on my life; service to elders and their loved ones. My life’s calling came as a result of being present in my 106 year old, loving grandmother’s journey until her last breath. Although I loved her dearly, I often felt troubled that I couldn’t be there for her like I wanted. Life got in the way; being a wife and mother and having a successful career. She was pretty healthy, but she lacked companionship. I knew there were things that could improve the quality of her life such as long talks, sharing stories, cooked meals, and transportation to the doctors, stores and church. I did my best, but there simply wasn’t enough time in the day to show up like I felt she deserved. Her passing gave my life’s purpose clear; service to elders and their loved ones. I made it my life’s mission to promote the final years as a sacred, beautiful, honorable stage of life. I became a hospice volunteer and a certified end-of-life doula, a person who assists in the dying process, much like a birth doula does with the birthing process. Working with elderly patients has been life affirming so much so that I left a career of 20+ years. Along with my team, we serve as non-medical elderly companions who specialize in physical, emotional and spiritual care. We meet our clients on their terms, see them as whole, and build relationships with them and their loved ones. Our self-care regimen, personal growth and intuition allow us to mindfully hold space and provide comfort for elderly people and their family in a non-judgmental, loving manner. Our motto “heart to heart" is evident in the holistic elder companionship we provide. Holding this space decreases the stress and fears family members face when looking for care for their loved ones; whether they are in need of respite relief, work long hours or live long distance. We can help. Through extensive end-of-life doula training, we are able to provide support, education, and suggestions for comfort. We have a toolkit of available resources to ease the anxious person and their family members including virtual “elder cams,” essential oils, crystals, reiki, mindfulness practices, etc. We are often referred to as “angels”, “Godsends”, “extraordinary”, “beyond belief” and words of the like. Contact us TODAY to see how we can be of assistance to you TOMORROW and we promise to assist in enhancing the life of your loved elder. MEMBERSHIPS National End-of-Life Doula Alliance Doulagivers National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization End of Life Practitioners Collective National Home Funeral Alliance CERTIFICATIONS Doulagivers End of Life Doula Practitioners Training Reiki Level 2 VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE Ascend Hospice Reiki Practitioner and End of Life Doula Haven Hospice Reiki Practitioner


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